Hard vs soft water across America, mapped.

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This black powder will make natural gas greener.

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If all goes according to plan, Hamid Hemmati’s plan will fall flat. Hemmati is the project lead on the Two Dimensional Planetary Surface Landers, a NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts (NIAC) project that is in the planning stages. These flat probes would resemble solar panels, but with a flexible electronic body. Each lander would be less than a half inch thick and just over three feet on each side—small enough you could stack 10 to an orbiter. Sensors on board the probe would scan the terrain of a moon or planet below, giving insight into places no NASA lander has dared go. And then these two-dimensional explorers could deploy to the surface, providing a cheap way to reach some of the most difficult terrain in the solar system. 


"The most geologically interesting places are also the most hazardous to land," Hemmati says, "so typically NASA and ESA [the European Space Agency] don’t dare go to these places, because it doesn’t look good if you lose a half a billion dollar lander." 


Cosmic Concept: Exploring the Solar System With a Fleet of Flat Landers

If all goes according to plan, Hamid Hemmati’s plan will fall flat. 

Hemmati is the project lead on the Two Dimensional Planetary Surface Landers, a NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts (NIAC) project that is in the planning stages. These flat probes would resemble solar panels, but with a flexible electronic body. Each lander would be less than a half inch thick and just over three feet on each side—small enough you could stack 10 to an orbiter. Sensors on board the probe would scan the terrain of a moon or planet below, giving insight into places no NASA lander has dared go. And then these two-dimensional explorers could deploy to the surface, providing a cheap way to reach some of the most difficult terrain in the solar system. 

"The most geologically interesting places are also the most hazardous to land," Hemmati says, "so typically NASA and ESA [the European Space Agency] don’t dare go to these places, because it doesn’t look good if you lose a half a billion dollar lander." 

Cosmic Concept: Exploring the Solar System With a Fleet of Flat Landers

Instead of another tie, encourage your dad’s interest in science this Father’s Day with these clever gifts for science enthusiasts.

5 Father’s Day Gifts for Sciencey Dads

Compared to Soylent, which is chemicalpowders, flour, and oil, and Soylent Green, which is people, Ambronite seems downright normal. It’s not, of course: Like Soylent Green and Soylent, Ambronite is a “drinkable meal” intended to replace a regular, chewable meal. Made of 20 ingredients—including stinging nettles, spinach, and wild sea-buckthorn—that you mix with water, each package of Ambronite has 500 calories and, its founders proclaim, all the nutrients you need to be healthy. "We’re solving the equation of busy eating in a hurry," says cofounder Simo Suoheimo. I have a hard time thinking of a situation in which I’d rather drink a 500-calorie greenish brown slurry than eat a slice of pizza. But Ambronite’s Indiegogo campaign suggests there are indeed people out there who would rather drink that slurry—the company reached its goal of $50,000 within a week. 


The Food of the Future Is a Greenish Brown Plant Paste From Finland

Compared to Soylent, which is chemicalpowders, flour, and oil, and Soylent Green, which is people, Ambronite seems downright normal. It’s not, of course: Like Soylent Green and Soylent, Ambronite is a “drinkable meal” intended to replace a regular, chewable meal. Made of 20 ingredients—including stinging nettles, spinach, and wild sea-buckthorn—that you mix with water, each package of Ambronite has 500 calories and, its founders proclaim, all the nutrients you need to be healthy. "We’re solving the equation of busy eating in a hurry," says cofounder Simo Suoheimo. 

I have a hard time thinking of a situation in which I’d rather drink a 500-calorie greenish brown slurry than eat a slice of pizza. But Ambronite’s Indiegogo campaign suggests there are indeed people out there who would rather drink that slurry—the company reached its goal of $50,000 within a week. 

The Food of the Future Is a Greenish Brown Plant Paste From Finland

Forget all those broken boards and crumbled concrete slabs. No feat of martial arts is more impressive than Bruce Lee’s famous strike, the one-inch punch. From a single inch away, Lee was able to muster an explosive blow that could knock opponents clean off the ground. Lee mastered it, fans worldwide adored it, and Kill Bill "borrowed" it. But if you’re like us, you want to know how it works. While the biomechanics behind the powerful blow certainly aren’t trivial, the punch owes far more to brain structure than to raw strength. 


The Science of the One-Inch Punch

Forget all those broken boards and crumbled concrete slabs. No feat of martial arts is more impressive than Bruce Lee’s famous strike, the one-inch punch. From a single inch away, Lee was able to muster an explosive blow that could knock opponents clean off the ground. Lee mastered it, fans worldwide adored it, and Kill Bill "borrowed" it. But if you’re like us, you want to know how it works. While the biomechanics behind the powerful blow certainly aren’t trivial, the punch owes far more to brain structure than to raw strength. 

The Science of the One-Inch Punch

For patients diagnosed with brain tumors, long-term survival rates tend to be bleak. Glioblastoma, the most common primary brain cancer, may reappear even after intense chemotherapy regimens, which typically prolong life by only a few months. But new wearable devices that can treat patients outside of a hospital’s walls could be the key to better treatment. Yesterday the Israel-based oncology company NovoCure announced that its wearable, noninvasive therapy had achieved the longest median survival rate yet for these recurrent brain cancers. NovoCure’s NovoTTF-100A is a sort of anticancer hat that patients can wear outside of the hospital. It continuously fires low-intensity electric fields into the brain while patients go about their daily lives. The electricity stunts cell growth and halts the tumor’s uncontrolled progression, sparing healthy brain cells that rarely need to grow and divide.


The Electric Anticancer Helmet Battles Brain Tumors

For patients diagnosed with brain tumors, long-term survival rates tend to be bleak. Glioblastoma, the most common primary brain cancer, may reappear even after intense chemotherapy regimens, which typically prolong life by only a few months. But new wearable devices that can treat patients outside of a hospital’s walls could be the key to better treatment. 

Yesterday the Israel-based oncology company NovoCure announced that its wearable, noninvasive therapy had achieved the longest median survival rate yet for these recurrent brain cancers. NovoCure’s NovoTTF-100A is a sort of anticancer hat that patients can wear outside of the hospital. It continuously fires low-intensity electric fields into the brain while patients go about their daily lives. The electricity stunts cell growth and halts the tumor’s uncontrolled progression, sparing healthy brain cells that rarely need to grow and divide.

The Electric Anticancer Helmet Battles Brain Tumors

Scientists devise a way to deliver energy to heart or brain implants buried beneath inches of tissue.


Wireless Power Transfer Will Energize Our Implants

Scientists devise a way to deliver energy to heart or brain implants buried beneath inches of tissue.

Wireless Power Transfer Will Energize Our Implants