Now that the productive Kepler telescope is down for the count, astronomers are dreaming up new techniques and missions to help them find even more planets around alien stars.

8 New Ways to Search for Even More Planets

The Cold War revival is putting a chill on space-based cooperation. NASA associate administrator Michael F. O’Brien issued a statement this morning saying: “Given Russia’s ongoing violation of Ukraine’s sovereignty and territorial integrity, until further notice, the U.S. Government has determined that all NASA contacts with Russian Government representatives are suspended, unless the activity has been specifically excepted.”


The U.S. Suspends (Most) NASA Agreements With Russia Over Ukraine

The Cold War revival is putting a chill on space-based cooperation. NASA associate administrator Michael F. O’Brien issued a statement this morning saying: “Given Russia’s ongoing violation of Ukraine’s sovereignty and territorial integrity, until further notice, the U.S. Government has determined that all NASA contacts with Russian Government representatives are suspended, unless the activity has been specifically excepted.”

The U.S. Suspends (Most) NASA Agreements With Russia Over Ukraine

Mark Sirangelo, corporate vice president and heads of SNC’s Space Systems, has a better than front-row seat for America’s historic private space movement—he’s a player on the main stage. Sirangelo heads one of three companies that is designing spacecraft to bring humans into orbit for NASA.


Everything You Need to Know About Dream Chaser, America’s Next Space Plane

Mark Sirangelo, corporate vice president and heads of SNC’s Space Systems, has a better than front-row seat for America’s historic private space movement—he’s a player on the main stage. Sirangelo heads one of three companies that is designing spacecraft to bring humans into orbit for NASA.

Everything You Need to Know About Dream Chaser, America’s Next Space Plane

Seth Shostak, SETI senior astronomer, tells PopMech why it’s no surprise our search for alien life has so far come up empty—and why, if there really is intelligent life out there, we’ll find it within the next few decades.


The Search for Aliens Is Just Getting Started

Seth Shostak, SETI senior astronomer, tells PopMech why it’s no surprise our search for alien life has so far come up empty—and why, if there really is intelligent life out there, we’ll find it within the next few decades.

The Search for Aliens Is Just Getting Started

"The U.S. Air Force is looking for new ways to get its spy and GPS satellites into space for less money through their EELV (Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle) program. Currently United Launch Alliance, the joint venture of Lockheed Martin and Boeing, launches these satellites. But the rocket establishment is facing some competition in the form of Elon Musk and SpaceX."

Elon Musk to Congress: Here’s Why You Should Pick SpaceX

Thanks to the now-defunct Kepler telescope, last week NASA announced 715 new exoplanets in every Dr. Seussian size and makeup imaginable, and nearly doubled the number of exoplanets known to humanity. And more keep on pouring in. With that horde of new worlds, you might have missed a smaller announcement by a group of astrophysicists at the University of Hertfordshire in the UK, who just tacked on eight more exoplanets right around the corner in our cosmic neighborhood. 


Every Red Dwarf Star Has a Planet—And There Are 200 Billion Such Stars in the Galaxy

Thanks to the now-defunct Kepler telescope, last week NASA announced 715 new exoplanets in every Dr. Seussian size and makeup imaginable, and nearly doubled the number of exoplanets known to humanity. And more keep on pouring in. With that horde of new worlds, you might have missed a smaller announcement by a group of astrophysicists at the University of Hertfordshire in the UK, who just tacked on eight more exoplanets right around the corner in our cosmic neighborhood. 

Every Red Dwarf Star Has a Planet—And There Are 200 Billion Such Stars in the Galaxy

Even with the space shuttle in retirement, Cape Canaveral remains a busy spaceport. But can Florida’s Space Coast regain its hallowed place as the world’s capital of human spaceflight? Popular Mechanics tours the Cape to glimpse the present and future in heavy-lift rocket country.


Can Cape Canaveral Rise Again?

Even with the space shuttle in retirement, Cape Canaveral remains a busy spaceport. But can Florida’s Space Coast regain its hallowed place as the world’s capital of human spaceflight? Popular Mechanics tours the Cape to glimpse the present and future in heavy-lift rocket country.

Can Cape Canaveral Rise Again?

One thing to keep in mind as tensions rise between Russia and the West: We can’t send people to space without them.


By the Way, the World’s Space Missions Rely on Russian Hardware

One thing to keep in mind as tensions rise between Russia and the West: We can’t send people to space without them.

By the Way, the World’s Space Missions Rely on Russian Hardware

Success! Scientists launch a rocket into an aurora. 
Astronaut Luca Parmitano was about 44 minutes into a space walk in July 2013 when he felt something that shouldn’t be there—water inside his helmet and on the back of his head. He and partner Chris Cassidy continued their work on EVA-23 (EVA means extra-vehicular activity, which is NASA-speak for a space walk.) But shortly thereafter, water moved to Parmitano’s face and went up his nose, and he lost some communication with the ground. That forced the astronauts retreat back into the International Space Station, where they found about a liter and a half of water in Parmitano’s helmet. 


How a Misdiagnosis Almost Led to a Space Walking Disaster

Astronaut Luca Parmitano was about 44 minutes into a space walk in July 2013 when he felt something that shouldn’t be there—water inside his helmet and on the back of his head. He and partner Chris Cassidy continued their work on EVA-23 (EVA means extra-vehicular activity, which is NASA-speak for a space walk.) But shortly thereafter, water moved to Parmitano’s face and went up his nose, and he lost some communication with the ground. That forced the astronauts retreat back into the International Space Station, where they found about a liter and a half of water in Parmitano’s helmet. 

How a Misdiagnosis Almost Led to a Space Walking Disaster